Sabaton – History to Music

It was earlier this year when I first heard a song from Sabaton.  My brother dragged me into his room and insisted on introducing me to a new band he had found.  He pulled up a video on Youtube and pressed play.  At first, I didn’t know what was going on, then I heard the bells, then, the music started.  I listened to the lyrics and found myself curious as to what they meant.  My brother explained that the band wrote songs about historical events.  This one was about the Sack of Rome in 1527 and the last stand of the 189 Papal Swiss Guard.  Here is the link to the video:

Sabaton – The Last Stand

The lyrics are moving and the melody thrums through your veins.  At least it did for me.  After that song, my brother showed one or two more, but others I looked up on my own.  I was excited when I saw the songs they had and the historical significance they all had.  Here is a list of some of their songs:

  1. Winged Hussars – arrival of the Polish Winged Hussar heavy cavalry to the relief of the Siege of Vienna from the Turks.
  2. Shiroyama – the last stand of the 500 samurai against the emperor, ending the days of bushido in Japan.
  3. A Lifetime of War – a mourning for the Thirty Years War, that ravaged Europe.
  4. Carolus Rex – the rise of fifteen-year-old Charles XII of Sweden against the opposing powers of Denmark, Poland, and Russia.
  5. Sparta – the brave suicidal defense of the Pass of Thermopylae by the 300 Spartans against the Persian army.
  6. The Lost Battalion – the battalion of Americans that was pinned down in the Argonne during World War I.
  7. Lion of the North – Swedish king, Gustavas Adolphus, the man who started his country on its rise to power.

And they have plenty of others.  Some of the songs are also sung in another language and it is haunting.  The Ruina Imperii is an excellent example of that.

Sabaton – Ruina Imperii

It is about the return march of the Swedish soldiers from Norway after Charles XII, Carolus Rex, was mysteriously shot in the midst of a siege.  It just gets into my head and I start humming and singing whenever I’m at work.  I’m sure some of my co-workers see me walking around, mouthing something, and say, “What the hell is that girl saying now?”

I don’t recommend the songs if you are an older person (with hearing aids) and don’t like heavy metal.  But, if you do enjoy heavy metal and learning something inside a good melody, you should listen to Sabaton.  And if you live in the US, pay attention!  They’ll be visiting us next year!

And on that note, it’s been real!

The Border Men – A Study of Masculinity

Very few people these days probably remember the Zane Grey novels or the wonderful stories they tell.  I have read a couple of them, but my favorites are the ones that pertain to the Zane family.  The author himself was the great-grandson of Ebenezer Zane, and the great-grandnephew of Jonathan and Betty Zane.  His family were the founders of Zanesville in Ohio, and great patriots and scouts of the frontier.  So, he wrote a trilogy that elaborated on his family; as well as their relationship with great border man, Lewis Wetzel, or Deathwind as he was called by the Native American Indians.

The one thing people cannot deny when they read Betty Zane, Spirit of the Border, and The Last Trail is the utter and true masculinity of the men involved.  The frontier of Ohio during and after the American Revolution did not tolerate weaklings and peaceful men.  Those men came after the land had been settled and the area secured by more noble souls.

The two lead men who the reader hear most of in all three books are Jonathan Zane and Lew Wetzel.  While the first book does focus on the courage and speed of Betty Zane, the books always have something to say about the two border men.  Now, the definition of a border man was basically an Indian scout and tracker.  Both Zane and Wetzel were intimate with the ways of the Indians, as they had both been held captive by them at least once in their lives.  They had varying opinions about the Indians, for personal reasons.  Jonathan did not hate all Indians, he just didn’t trust them as far as he could throw them.  He had been kidnapped with all his brothers (he was one of five boys), and watched as his youngest brother, Isaac Zane, was separated from them for years. For Wetzel, it was different.  When he was about eleven-years-old, he went hunting with his thirteen-year-old brother.  Upon their return from hunting, they found their home burned and their parents and other siblings butchered and scalped by Indians.  This set Lewis Wetzel on a path of revenge that consumed the remainder of his life.

The first book in the trilogy is about Betty Zane, the youngest and only girl in the Zane family.  Naturally, she’s doted upon by her four (surviving) older brothers.  Throughout the story, Wetzel is soft spoken and caring of Betty, and when one of the villains tries to forcefully kiss her, Wetzel almost kills him.  That was how gentlemen viewed the honor of women: it was sacred.  Eventually in the book, he reveals to Betty that he is in love with her; but because of all the men he’s killed, he feels he is not good enough for her.  When the man she does love is stabbed in the dark by the aforementioned rogue, Wetzel hunts him down and kills him for Betty.  Because he loves her, he kills for her.  Then, he returns and helps defend Fort Henry against Indians and British forces, even holding an opening in the wall all by himself with just an ax.  Tragically in the end, Lew Wetzel must abstain from women, and Betty Zane marries another man.

The second book does focus more on Wetzel as he traverses the frontier around historical Fort Henry.  A wagon train has brought more settlers as well as Moravian missionaries, dedicated to converting the Indians, to the fort.  Two, identical twin brothers take separate paths: one is a missionary and a peaceful man; and the other wants to follow in the steps of Wetzel.  However, scheming renegades and dangerous Indians soon interrupt their lives and throw them all out of balance.  Wetzel is reaffirmed in his life choices when he finds the bodies of the young scout and the young girl he loved.  He buries them side by side and goes to save the second young couple.  In one of the pivotal scenes in the book, the renegade, Girty, attempts to rape a woman, while the missionary is bound nearby.  Wetzel and Zane come crashing in, and Wetzel savagely kills the outlaws for what they did before and what they were about to do.  Once again, a man’s got to do what a man’s got to do.

In the third and final book, Grey focuses on his great-uncle, Jonathan Zane.  Zane is described as being a lover of nature and of the wild; a quiet, thoughtful man.  In the final book, he meets his match in the fiery Helen Shepard, a young girl from Virginia.  She is immediately smitten with him, but he does not reciprocate her feelings.  Through the matchmaking wiles of his siblings, Eb and Betty Zane; Jonathan and Helen are drawn into a sort of Much Ado About Nothing love trap.  However, a traitor within the fort has his eyes on Helen, and hates Jonathan Zane.  After being wounded, kidnapped, and then returned by Wetzel, Jonathan owns up to his feelings for Helen, but begs her not to return them.  But, he must also confess this to Wetzel when she is taken from the fort (not to mention that Wetzel basically called it from the first moment he met Helen).  His old friend tells him to leave their life of scouting and hunting and marry Helen, because he won’t let him miss his chance like he did with Betty.  In the end, Jonathan makes the right choice, and Wetzel continues his path alone.

Zane Grey wrote about real men; rough and rugged, but also kind and caring.  These men killed so that their families, or the families of others might live in peace.  Isn’t that honorable?  Isn’t that something to be admired; and not scorned?  It is truly a twisted world that doesn’t acknowledge real men, and instead, tries to beat them down.

And on that note, it’s been real!

 

Sharpe’s Series: The Napoleonic War Down A Rifle Barrel

Now, most people would think that I would be too young to know what this series is about.  But, I’m not.  Well, I kind of am, but I’m cultured.  My dad mentioned it to me because “That guy who played Boromir in LOTR is the main character.  You might like it.”  I finally asked my brother if he saw them at the library to pick them up for me.  He returned with two episodes.  Episode 3 and Episode 4.  There are sixteen total.  I started watching them out of order, but was hooked with Episode 3.  Before they were this show, they were books, and I got the first book for my birthday, and read it in twenty-four hours.  My siblings just started getting me the books, and I know have eleven books, and five of the episodes.  I will explain what each episode is eventually, but right now, I think I’ll just talk about the main characters of the show.

Sean Bean is Richard Sharpe.  Richard Sharpe is the son of a prostitute, who grew up in an orphanage and volunteered for the army in order to fill his sergeant’s quota.  He was cruelly treated by that same sergeant, Sgt. Hakeswill, and his commanding officer, Cpt. Morris.  Sharpe was able to escape from them and he saved Sir Arthur Wellesley’s life.  The Commander of the British Forces on the Continent (Spain), then made Sharpe a lieutenant.  Since Sharpe is not an officer, he is looked down upon by the other officers because he is not ‘a gentleman’.  Sharpe doesn’t take crap from other people; if they are below him, he plays rough until they bend; if they are above him, he hides his disrespect beneath a layer of subtle sarcasm.  Sean Bean played the rule-breaking, rough-around-the-edges British Rifleman to a tee.  And he was certainly a heart throb.

Darragh O’Malley is Patrick Harper.  Patrick Harper is an Irishman, who joined the King’s Army so that he might not go hungry.  When he first meets Sharpe, the two start off as enemies: Sharpe disliking Harper for disrespecting him, and Harper disliking Sharpe because he’s not a proper officer.  After beating each other up, Harper starts to point stuff out and Sharpe listens to him.  Harper soon realizes that Sharpe is asset because he is an officer, but also used to be a common soldier.  Sharpe repeatedly tells his men, “That I know every dirty trick.  Why?  Because I was one of you.”  Harper soon becomes Sharpe’s most loyal friend and comrade-in-arms.  His position is very important because he finds himself frequently watching Sharpe’s back in fights.

The Sharpe Series became a treat for me at night when dinner and the kitchen were done, right before I went to bed.  I enjoyed the history, and the characters (the heroes) were all lovable and quirky in their own way.  I still have to collect the rest of the episodes and I am still missing a few books.  Well… my sibs know what to get me for birthdays and Christmas!

And on that note, it’s been real!

 

Master & Commander: The Far Side of the Theater

As I mentioned at the beginning of this week, Master & Commander had potential for being an epic period masterpiece.  There are five books in the entire series, and approximately four stories per book.  O’Brian’s books are the perfect material for a show.  One season could be two stories and so one.  That would have run for at least 10-11 seasons.  Decent length for a show, at least for one that has actual material to work off of.  But enough of how I could plan the perfect show, I’m talking about how the movie got panned.

Again, I believe some of the reasons it didn’t do well was because many people don’t have a proper understanding of History.  Facts to remember are that the Napoleonic War came about because of the French Revolution.  It was the cause, and Bonaparte was the affect.  The movie itself featured an all-male cast, and that might have been another problem.  Although moves like Expendables that also featured mostly male casts did fairly well, historical pieces are different.  It is usually nice to have at least one female character for us to fantasize getting together with the hero.  Aubrey’s love is hinted to at the beginning of the movie, but we don’t actually see her at all; and Dr. Maturin doesn’t have anybody but his sciences.  In the books, he had a dalliance with a rival, female spy for Bonaparte.  Dangerous and it would have been small screen gold!  Anyway, they did not have a female character at all.  Of course, we also have to take into consideration that they are on the far side of the world, literally!  They were a war ship, so they would never have been transporting civilians.  That, and no noble women would have been around, so for accuracy’s sake, they didn’t put a woman in; but that might have cost them some good publicity.

Another factor: the men might not have been good enough?  Now, for me personally, I liked the men they picked.  Russell Crowe was accurately cast in the lead.  Aubrey was described as a slightly heavy-set but capable man.  Maybe he wasn’t everybody’s cup of tea?  As for the secondary lead, Dr. Steven Maturin, Paul Bettany played the acerbic but thoughtful doctor to a tee.  He challenges Aubrey whenever he thinks he’s caring too much about his duty and not enough about his men.  Captain Aubrey is a man with a moral code, and that means following the orders he was given.  Maturin has to play conscience every once in a while.

If you have seen the movie and/or read the books, you would know that they left the movie open for more.  Unfortunately, nobody understands or appreciates History, so the movie did not do well, and no continuations were made.  However, I would fully condone a remake, as a series of course.  I would have Charlie Hunnam as Capt. ‘Lucky’ Jack Aubrey, and JJ Feild as Dr. Steven Maturin.  Their adventures would grace the small screen like a well played battle maneuver!

And on that note, it’s been real!

Vikings: Nordic Fact & Fiction

Whoever at the History Channel headquarters decided to make a show about the Vikings, was a genius.  The Vikings was a success and has been a fixture on their channel for several seasons (going on six now).  It has several characters we have all come to love and follow and many fronts on which to fight.  The series is based loosely on the actual viking, Ragnar Lothbrok, who was the first viking to begin raiding in Great Britain and Frankia.

The series quickly grew a cult following for its array of interesting characters, violence, adult content, and historical intrigue.  I believe that people are more captivated by the desires and ambitions of ancient kings than they are with modern politicians.  Kings maybe seem more human, and possibly unselfish in their reasoning’s.  Example: King Ecbert wants to be king of all Britannia in an attempt to end the constant power struggles taking place across the island.  Unselfish… right?  Ambitious?  Definitely!  Ragnar raids in the name of exploration.  Their world had been so small until he sailed west.  Rollo just wants to be thanked, to be appreciated for what he has given to the viking community.  None has been forth coming, so he made a strategic decision, married a Frankish princess, and became Lord of Paris.  He goes from nobody to somebody in a hurry!

Floki, a complicated (and insane) character, who has always lived to serve Ragnar, but he has his doubts throughout the series.  He picked on Athelstan because of his Christian beliefs and when they raided Britannia, he revealed his hatred for all things pertaining to Catholicism.  He murders Athelstan, claiming he’s protecting Ragnar.  I’m not going to lie, I started to dislike Floki a little more after that.  And then he began to harass Rollo for almost every decision he made.  Annoying!  Anyway…  The character of Floki has gone from being a ‘good’ guy to being a very morally ambiguous person.  He kills all Catholics with sickening glee and revels in their blood.  Not what you would consider normal or right.

Lagertha has gone through a transformation of her own.  She went from being Ragnar’s housewife (with a warrior’s background), to a warrior chief in her own rite, and finally, the Queen of Kattegat.  However, she can’t seem to find happiness with another man outside of Ragnar.  She left him of her own free will because he asked her to share her power and his affection with Princess Aslaug.  Lagertha is a proud woman and refused, so she left.  Lagertha has always stood up for herself and has gotten herself so far.  But now, she faces a war, a war for her position in Kattegat.  We shall see this season if she keeps her life and her throne.

Once more, a series has proven that through time, production money, and view-able characters, people can enjoy a period piece, and not even know they’re learning some history.

And on that note, it’s been real!

Tarzan: King of the Cinema?

Alright!  Who remembers the Edgar Rice Burroughs’ books called Tarzan?  Okay, let me rephrase that…  Who remembers the Disney animated Tarzan movie?  Got your attention now, didn’t I?  Now, I’m not going to lie to you; when my dad made me read these books, I wasn’t overly interested.  The first book was pretty decent.  It tells the story of a British aristocrat and his wife getting set adrift in a boat after the sailors on their vessel mutiny.  They land on a jungle island not far off the coast of Africa.  From there, Lord Greystoke builds them a safe haven in the trees.  Afterward, his wife gives birth to a son, but dies shortly after.  He follows her, and their baby is discovered by an anthrapoid (Burroughs made it up) ape, adopted, and given the name Tarzan.  From there, he has to carve a place for himself in the family group of apes.  He faces his challenges and grows up to be a powerful man-ape.

Enter Jane Porter, an American girl and daughter of a Professor Archimedes Q. Porter.  Tarzan saves her from a rouge ape and obviously takes an interest.  However, there is another man who also likes Jane.  Say hello to John Clayton, the ‘heir’ to Tarzan’s fortune.  They were cousins or something like that.  Well, Jane Porter and her father and Clayton eventually leave the island, and Tarzan misses her.  He rescues a Frenchman from cannibals and learns to speak English.  When they are rescued, the first thing he does is journey to America to see Jane.  The book ends without him getting her, but Burroughs wrote several more and they did get married and had a son.  However, Jane Porter needs to be saved so many times, it’s nauseating.

In the original movie they did, Tarzan has been living in England as John Clayton, Lord Greystoke.  Jane and he still do not have children, and are upset over a miscarriage.  However, a cunning Belgian, Leon Rom, tricks them into coming to Africa and kidnaps Jane in an attempt to lure Tarzan into Mbonga’s clutches.  The movie was entertaining and the banter between Tarzan and George Washington Williams (Sam L. Jackson) tickled my funny bones.  However, it did not do well at the box office.  My theory behind that is that many of the people who went to see it had never read a single Tarzan book.  I read two (hey, at least I did that!).  Although, who doesn’t appreciate a strong, tall, and handsome, and shirtless man swinging in to save them?  Not like you see that every day anymore.  And for the guys, there’s Margot Robbie.

And on that note, it’s been real!

The Tudors: The First of Its Kind

Most people know about The Tudors when it comes to historical shows.  It was basically the first ever big retelling of an historical era.  And, it was very successful for the duration of its running time.  But, what made it so successful?  What was its secret?

It’s secret was having a decent dose of adult content (sexual), violence, politics, characters that kept us guessing, drama, and a dash of history.  I also think that even though the show was mainly about Henry VIII and all the changes he wrought in his kingdom (and the rest of Europe), most people watched it to see what happened to each wife.  Yes, we all know that he divorced Katherine of Aragon, beheaded Anne Boleyn, lost Jane Seymour, divorced Anne of Cleves, beheaded Katherine Howard, and died before Katherine Parr.  The actresses who were selected to play each wife were all beautiful in their own way, and acted them superbly.

As for the politics, they perfectly discussed each problem and revolutionary change that took place in England.  The dissolution of Catholicism and the beginning of the Anglican Church.  We watched the Act of Succession tear England apart, and in a way, destroy the family that helped set it on that path in the first place: the Boleyns.  We all saw how the Pilgrimage of Grace was brutally and cruelly crushed.  As a student of History, I was impressed by everything they did.   What was the secret?  They presented a complex time in history in a digestible and enjoyable manner for all to admire.  Series and shows are more capable of doing that than a movie.  That’s why I’m contemplating adjusting my Scarlet Pimpernel screenplay into a series instead of the movie format it is currently.  We shall see.

And on that note, it’s been real!